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Singing SecondWhen agencies are asked to present their credentials as part of a series of interviews, conventional wisdom is that you always want to be last, or if there are just two presenters, you want to go second.

While watching the recent Army/Navy college football game, I was awed – as I always am -- by the incredible pomp and circumstance that would make any other special event look like a tea party.  Following each Army/Navy match-up, both teams sing their school fight-songs – with the winning team earning the honor of proudly singing second.   It’s a tremendous tradition capping a rivalry that most of us cannot fully understand.

“Singing second” is a great way to describe victory.

 

Here are some other second thoughts.  You probably don’t want to play second fiddle, but there is nothing wrong with playing second base.  Based on the Cubs’ World Series title, is Chicago still the second city – as tagged by A. J. Liebling in a 1952 article in The New Yorker?

Second chances might be more valuable than first chances, but second-class is definitely NOT first-class. Second-hand is often appealing – but it isn’t new.

If there are only two in the race, second-to-last means you’re a winner. It also means coming in second is better than a last-place finish. As for last at-bats – you always want them.  And, it might not always be smart to take advantage of “last call,” but it’s usually best to get the last laugh.

Scott Hanson
Scott Hanson
President Scott is president of HMA Public Relations and a founding member of the Public Relations Global Network. He’s a Phoenix native, husband, father of two and a fan of all sports and a participant in some. Check out Scott's full bio