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shelbThere’s an Elite Daily article being shared across the internet, stirring conversation and raising interesting points on the millennial generation, which includes those born approximately between 1980 and the early 2000s, though there doesn’t seem to be an agreed upon date. It offers 50 things that millennials do in the workforce that are shaking things up in corporate America. I’ve listened to many opinions about this article. Some note that millennials are just trying to define themselves when there is nothing differential about them.  Others believe the article make millennials sound somewhat criminal.  A few people in other generations relating to the 50 points believe they were born in the wrong era and some millennials find it quite fitting.

I think it’s worth discussing if millennials really are influencing corporate America’s work culture. So, what are the facts, not stereotypes, about millennials, otherwise known as Gen Y in the workforce? According to the Millennial Impact Report, millennials find these three things important when looking to work for a company in order of importance:

  • What the company does, produces, distributes, et al.
  • The company’s work culture and environment
  • The company’s involvement with causes

According to this study, majority of millennials want to see companies performing pro bono work and provide volunteer opportunities to employees. But, is this really limited to millennials only? Statistics show that the more a millennial employee works for a company, the less they’re willing to donate time in volunteer work, as they’re more likely to donate something of monetary value. It seems that there’s a sense of urgency to participate in volunteer efforts early on in their employment, but that slowly declines with time. Personally, I think this could be said about any generation who is just starting out.

We also know, according to the study, that millennials will have longevity with a company first based on if their passions and talents are being used to the fullest potential. This is followed by their bonds with coworkers and the belief in a company’s mission and purpose.

Millennials are currently coined as the “Entitled Generation.” Does it hold truth, and if it does, will it always? The baby boomers railed against "the man,” but now they've become the man. Generation X was considered the “Slackers,” but they’ve proven to be quite the achievers.

Millennials are the growing demographic in the workforce. According to an article from the Harvard Business Review, millennials will soon, if not already, account for nearly half the employees in the world, and in some companies, they already constitute a majority. Back to the original thought, do millennials define today’s work culture? If they do, what are your thoughts?

Shelby Ray
Shelby Ray
A former HMA Public Relations employee.

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